Birding at REGUA

REGUA is the premier birdwatching site in the Atlantic Forest – one of South America’s most biodiverse and endemic-rich biomes. Of the 930 bird species found in the Atlantic Forest, 480 have been recorded at REGUA, including 62 Brazilian endemics, 118 species endemic to the Atlantic Forest and several species that can be considered REGUA specialities. Over 200 bird species have been recorded at our wetlands alone. More »

Accommodation

Our visitor lodge, built for birders and people interested in natural history, is located beside our wetlands with stunning views across the reserve and easy access to a network of marked trails that can be walked with or without a guide. The lodge is full board and equipped to a high standard with 10 en-suite rooms, a swimming pool, and an extensive natural history library. We also offer a transfer service to and from Rio de Janeiro located 1.5 hours away. More »

Birdwatching excursions

Join our birdwatching excursions from the lodge to a variety of Atlantic Forest habitats off-reserve, in search of over 100 species of birds not present at REGUA. The focus of our excursions is finding endemic Atlantic Forest birds including Restinga Antwren, Grey-winged Cotinga, Itatiaia Thistletail and Three-toed Jacamar. We also organise night-birding excursions to look for Giant Snipe, owls, potoos, nightjars and other nocturnal birds. More »

About REGUA

Narrated by Michael Palin, produced by Verity White/Five Films, soundtrack by Matthew Sheeran. Watch in HD »

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Make a donation to REGUA

With only 7% of the original forested area remaining, the Atlantic Forest of South America is one of the most threatened ecosystems on Earth, but also one the most biodiverse! REGUA protects over 9,000 hectares of forest and has the opportunity to purchase more land protect more forest, but we have to act fast as encroaching urbanisation is rapidly increasing land prices. Please support REGUA by making a donation. Donate »

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5 days ago

Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu

Mudas coletadas no viveiro do INEA em Trajano de Morais.
A Reserva Ecológica do Gupiaçu adquiriu estas mudas para acrescentar no reflorestamento de uma área no Matumbo.
Um grande exemplo, Nicholas e Raquel, Presidente e Vice-presidente que buscaram e descarregaram as mudas com ajuda dos colaboradores da REGUA.
#pormaisverde
#pormaisareasreflorestadas
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2 weeks ago

Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu

Episódio interessante registrado pelo nosso guia Adilei da Cunha durante o carnaval. Uma Bothrops Jararacussu capturou um porco-espinho/ouriço-cacheiro, porém ao tentar engolir, os espinhos do ouriço a mataram. ... See MoreSee Less

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3 weeks ago

Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu

Obrigado Projeto Recicla Itaboraí pela visita.
Estamos anciosos por novas parceriasQuem não gosta de aprender fora de sala?

A equipe do Projeto Recicla Itaboraí visitou a REGUA - Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu e teve a oportunidade de conhecer os projetos incríveis realizados por lá.

A ideia agora é levar nossos alunos para aprender mais sobre o meio ambiente e a importância da sua preservação através do contato direto com a natureza.

Reserva Ecológica De Guapiaçu - REGUA
#MeioAmbiente #Sustentabilidade #Natureza #REGUA
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3 weeks ago

Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu

Grupo de estudantes do Centro Universitario Celso Lisboa fazendo um levantamento fotografico da biodiversidade da REGUA em parceria com o laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas climaticas (UERJ).
Bem-vindas Carine, Carol, Carla e Luisa!
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3 weeks ago

Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu

Camille Bonhomme is a French Doctorate student working with bromelias for two months.

"As a part of my PhD, I am interested in the effect of the quantity of food resources in a freshwater ecosystem on the ability of the community to recover after a drought event.
I am using bromelias as miniature aquatic ecosystems hosting communities of diverse invertebrates (mostly aquatic larvae becoming terrestrial adults) in the water tanks at the axil of their leaves. In those microcosms, dead leaves from surrounding trees falling in the tanks provide the basal source of food. Those leaves are decomposed by detritivores, like mosquito larvae, which are in turn eaten by predators, especially damselflies larvae.

I designed an experiment where I manipulated the quantity of food resources (dead leaves) inside the tanks of 30 bromeliads. First, I assessed if the quantity of food available was determinant for the invertebrates community composition and diversity under normal rainfall conditions. I found that bromeliads containing more food host richer and more diverse invertebrate communities.

The second part of the experiment will consist in assessing the recovery of those invertebrate communities following a severe drought, to see if it is affected by the quantity of available resources. I sheltered each bromeliad to avoid rainfall, and let the plants tanks dry out naturally. Then I removed the rainshelters to let the rainfall fill the plant again. I am now following the recovery of the associated invertebrate communities along time, by regularly sampling and identifying bromeliads inhabitants. I expect the dead leaves to enhance communities recovery to drought by creating moist refuges favouring in-situ invertebrates survival, and by attracting more colonizers from other bromeliads when the drought have passed. To dissociate those two potential mechanisms, half of the plants are covered with a mosquito net, to avoid recolonization and thus isolate the “refugee effect” of leaves. "
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