Category Archives: RPPN

REGUA’s 4th and 5th RPPN areas go ahead

We are very pleased to announce that the formal documents including Geo-referenced maps have been handed to the INEA (RJ State Institute of the Environment) for validation.

The papers were presented as part of the process to guarantee the long term protection for REGUA’s forests and biodiversity.

RRPN 5 comprises 97 hectares of the lower slopes of the Serra do Mar mountains (© N Locke)

REGUA already has three RPPN’s areas totalling 367 hectares and these two extra reserve parcels will more than double the area under this permanent protection. Short of giving the land to make a National Park, Private Reserve (RPPN) status is the best tool for long term conservation, and offers donors the possibility of acquiring land and guaranteeing its permanent protection.

Under full protection status, only activities in research, tourism and education are permitted. The effect in planning and transparency raises REGUA’s profile and the ambition to become the largest RPPN owner in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

One of the conditions to create RPPN is that the property is fully forested, and REGUA’s reforestation programme is currently completing two projects that will enable REGUA to become the second largest RPPN owner in the state by next year. 

INEA geographer Evelyn de Castro is conferring GPS location

1st RPPN Seminar held at REGUA

On August 24th, Regua hosted the Inaugural  RPPN(*) or “Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural” Scientific Seminar in Rio de Janeiro state.

The REGUA Seminar Team (© REGUA)

INEA – Rio de Janeiro State Environmental Agency – encourages land owners to create their own private reserves  which are officially recognized by the state government.   RPPN status allows no direct use of the land but allows activities such as environmental education, sustainable tourism and scientific research to be carried out.    Much of REGUA’s land has been granted RPPN status and three new areas were finalised last August.

There were over 100 participants attending the event that started in the morning and continued until the evening.

Studies on forest ecology, flora and fauna inventories were presented to a very interested audience.

Land owners, university professors, undergraduates, post graduates, state and municipal authorities enjoyed this seminar which enriched everyone´s knowledge on the Atlantic Forest.

Tom Locke

Fieldwork training (© Adilei Carvalho da Cunha)

 

*The nearest English translation would be Private Natural Heritage Reserve

Three more RPPN certificates are granted

REGUA was delighted to attend a presentation in Rio recently for three more areas of the Reserve to be granted RPPN status.

Presenting 18 awards to various land owners were  André Correâ,  Rio de Janeiro State Secretary for the Environment and Paul Schiavo, Director of Biodiversity for the State Institute of the Environment (INEA).

Nicholas (far right) receiving three RPPN Certificates
Nicholas (far right) with other recipients of RPPN Certificates (© Sue Healey)

The 18 new certificates cover around 900 hectares, bringing the total number of RPPN protected areas to 78 and a total area of 11,000 hectares.   They are located in 12 local authorities across the State and are contributing to the preservation of important fragments of Atlantic Forest.

André Correâ acknowledged that the owners of the 78 RPPN areas had achieved their work  without support and congratulated them saying:
“The most ancient civilisations said that the life is worthwhile when your son is born, you plant a tree and write a book. You are going there, are contributing with your legacy, with much more than a tree, and who knows that these RPPNs will not serve as inspiration for a book.”

He added that the State Environment Agency want to  ….
” build a policy of tourist attractions. Let’s build a sustainable tourism programme, ecotourism, for RPPNs.  Another important issue is how to trade in the stock of carbon held in these preserved trees. This may become attractive to make a RPPN not only by the legitimate gesture of wanting to preserve the heritage”

Paul Schiavo added
“The creation of private reserves means that society is moving towards managing to participate in the day to day control of areas  fundamental to guarantee life.   Many of these private reserves are the major water sources in a region.   We will increasingly encourage, facilitate the creation, so that those gaps that the state does not fill is complete by individuals“ 

Their words totally confirm REGUA’s successful model for sustainable ecotourism supporting the mission of the long-term conservation of the forests of the upper Guapiaçu river basin.